Field Trips

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View / Print the AAS Field Trip Schedule 2014-2015  (PDF file: if does not print correctly, set Acrobat to print as image)

Mar
7
Sat
Morningside Nature Center
Mar 7 @ 8:00 am

Meet City Naturalist Geoff Parks in the Morningside parking lot. MNC contains more than seven miles of trails that wind through sandhills, flatwoods, cypress domes, and habitat restoration areas. The resident breeders – Pine Warblers, Eastern Towhees, Brown-headed Nuthatches, and Red-headed Woodpeckers – should be busy singing and establishing territories.

Difficulty: 2 (may involve uneven terrain one to two miles).

Mar
21
Sat
Watermelon Pond
Mar 21 @ 7:30 am

Difficulty: 2 (may involve uneven terrain one to two miles).

Mar
23
Mon
Program meeting: The Cross-Florida Migration of Common Loons
Mar 23 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

Dr. Andrew Kratter, Collection Manager in the Ornithology Division at Florida Museum of Natural History will present Seabirding in Alachua County? The Cross-Florida Common Loon Migration.

Common Loons are an iconic bird in much of North America. In their stunning breeding plumage, they breed across the northern US and across Canada. Their wild yodeling calls are a hallmark of mist shrouded northern lakes, and they are the national bird of Canada, appearing on their $1coins (better known as “Loonies”). In their drabber winter plumage, they undertake a great migration to winter on the Pacific, Atlantic, and Gulf of Mexico coasts. They are a well known migrant at coastal observations points. So why is this an interesting topic here in the middle of Florida, far from either coast and a long way from mist shrouded northern lakes? In the mid-1990s it was discovered that a few Common Loons could be seen flying over Gainesville in late March and early April. Dr. Kratter thought it would be fun to document this migration and discovered that this migration is much more extensive than he could ever have imagined and likely involves a large percentage of the population wintering in peninsular Florida. He will give details of this discovery and explain the pattern, extent, and timing of this unlikely migration route.

Mar
29
Sun
Ocala National Forest
Mar 29 @ 7:30 am

Meet in the parking lot of the Winn-Dixie at SW 34th Street and 20th Avenue.

Difficulty: 3 (may involve elevation change, uneven terrain, and/or greater than two miles).

Apr
11
Sat
Wildflowers
Apr 11 @ 8:00 am

Meet in the Winn-Dixie parking lot at the corner of SW 34th Street and 20th Avenue.

Difficulty: 2 (may involve uneven terrain one to two miles).

Apr
12
Sun
San Felasco Hammock Preserve State Park (Millhopper Road entrance)
Apr 12 @ 8:00 am

Difficulty: 2 (may involve uneven terrain one to two miles).

Apr
18
Sat
Mill Creek Preserve
Apr 18 @ 8:00 am

Difficulty: 2 (may involve uneven terrain one to two miles).

Cedar Key by boat
Apr 18 @ 12:45 pm

Difficulty: 1 (trip within easy access to the vehicle and/or level terrain one mile or less).

Apr
22
Wed
Program meeting: Cracking the Anti-Predator Code of Tufted Titmice
Apr 22 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

Our Wildland Security Advisory System: Cracking the Anti-Predator Code of Tufted Titmice presented by Dr. Katie Sieving, Professor Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida.

The delightful Paridae (chickadees and titmice) are highly social birds that exhibit exceptional vocal complexity. Capable of encoding 2/3 of the information that the English language can, the sophisticated information encoded in parid calls is used by numerous species to avoid danger and enhance survival. Dr. Sieving will discuss how we decode meaning in Parid calls and how we are beginning to map landscapes of animal information.